Could Gold And Silver Bullion Be The Best Place To Invest Your Money For The Next Few Years?

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This is not going to be an easy article to write. Almost two years ago I wrote a similar article focusing on why investing in gold could be a smart move. This was around the time of Donald Trump’s surprise US presidential victory. Like the result of the UK Referendum to remain or leave the European Union, it was a classic black swan event, which very few foresaw. Around that time the conventional wisdom was that the world was going to go to hell in a handcart and that gold or anything seen with ‘defensive’ qualities was the place to invest your money. Gold in fact did not do much after Trump’s surprise win and actually went down in value. By the end of 2016 gold was just trading at less then $1200 an ounce. As of today gold is trading at $1232 an ounce.

Many analysts and others have been mystified by the lack of movement in the gold price over the last two years when one takes into account much of the geo-political situation and volatility engulfing the world. During that time period the biggest winners have been cryptocurrencies. 2017 was the year when Bitcoin and interest in other cryptocurrencies exploded. I mentioned Bitcoin briefly in my article from two years ago yet my understanding of the currency was limited. From January 2017 until the end of that year, the price of Bitcoin went mad shooting from $1000 a coin to almost $20,000 by December of that year. I remember being in a café in Amsterdam in June 2017 investigating Bitcoin further. Around that time the price was $2500 a coin. It had already more than tripled in value since the time I wrote my last article on gold around the start of November 2016. Even at that time I thought the price was overvalued and I was sceptical, especially since a new kind of herd mentality was manifesting. By that time interest in other cryptocurrencies was also taking hold. Ethereum, for many months just the preserve of hardcore crypto-heads and early adopters, was also exploding in value. It was my sister who first made me aware of Ethereum back in April 2017. Around that time the price was $50 a coin. At the start of the year the price was only $10 so it had an even bigger rise than Bitcoin. Yet two months later at the café in Amsterdam I was flabbergasted to witness the price shoot up even further to almost $400 a coin. Litecoin, the silver to Bitcoin’s gold, only around $4 a coin at the start of 2017, was trading at $30 a coin in June 2017. When the first surge of mainstream interest hit Bitcoin towards the end of 2013, Litecoin was by far the second most popular cryptocurrency. But since that first spike of interest, Litecoin (and Bitcoin) crashed and was in the doldrums for over three years before the next spike in 2017.

Since the start of 2018, the bubble burst for crypto and many cryptocurrencies lost a lot of their value. Interest still remains high and compared to the others, Bitcoin has held its value the best trading around the $6,500 mark over the last couple of months. You may be thinking why am I mentioning cryptocurrencies when the focus of this article is supposed to be on gold and silver? It is because there are some who think that certain cryptocurrencies take away the monopoly that precious metals have traditionally always had as a so-called ‘store of value’. It has been said that all the gold in the world amounts to the capacity of just three Olympic size swimming pools. It is scarce. Yet some argue that Bitcoin (and also Litecoin) is also a store of value since it has a supply cap of just 21 million coins. Two of the biggest investors in Bitcoin, the Winklevoss twins (also known for their association with Facebook), have gone as far as saying that Bitcoin will replace gold as a traditional store of value and that in the future, the scarcity of gold will be eroded by asteroid mining. It is true that Bitcoin has certain advantages gold doesn’t have. If you own lots of physical gold or silver you may have to store it in a vault and there will be storage charges. Moving it around with ease may also prove tricky. There is none of that with Bitcoin since it is digital and can also be used for swift payments. But that can also be its undoing; the fact that it is digital. In some countries such as Bolivia, it is illegal to trade Bitcoin or to use it as a payment method. At the end of the day, global governments can very easily outlaw it. Even if you had lots of Bitcoin in cold storage on an external hardrive in your bedroom it would be useless if that happened. That doesn’t mean to say I am against Bitcoin and crypto. I kind of have a secret admiration for it as, despite its volatility, it has enabled many ordinary citizens in some countries like Venezuela, which has been devastated by hyperinflation, to protect their hard earned savings from being further decimated in value. It isn’t always easy to acquire precious metals or even hard fiat currency for ordinary citizens in those parts of the world, so crypto can fill that gap in its accessibility.

I cannot predict the future of Bitcoin or where it and other cryptocurrencies may be heading. One of my biggest concerns regarding Bitcoin is that it is still far from being widely adopted and the people that own it are only doing so for speculative purposes. What’s more, I can only think of one place where I used Bitcoin and Litecoin to purchase something and that was at a Bitcoin café in Prague last year. Then again, more fool me if cryto goes an another epic bull run reaching dazzling new heights.

The reason why I like gold and silver is because neither are really in vogue at the moment. They are not as sexy or hot as crypto and I like the fact that the prices haven’t moved much and are still depressed compared with the new heights they both reached during the early part of this decade. Yet gold and silver can be frustrating assets to hold. If you go on YouTube there are no shortage of ‘gurus’ forecasting how gold will go to $10,000 an ounce and silver $1,000 an ounce. There is a lot of cynicism regarding gold and silver. Some argue that all those so called experts have been saying that gold will go to the moon for many years and it just hasn’t happened. Gold and silver haven’t moved much since the last spike around 2011-12 and so many gold and silver holders are understandably experiencing a heavy dose of fatigue and impatience.

Gold and silver prices are very difficult to predict and can sometimes move strongly for no rational reason at all. Traditional factors such as inflation, political instability, low interest rates, a weakening US dollar or a global stock market crash are no guarantee that a rise in the price of gold or silver will follow. Yet one thing is as clear as day; global debt levels are at an all time high. Not just in the developed world but also in the developing world especially in China. Most global stock markets have also been on a long bull run since 2009, yet this month we have witnessed the first signs of this bull market being derailed. In the process the price of gold began to rise, albeit very modestly. I would like to think that now the fortunes of gold and silver are finally about to change and I wouldn’t be surprised if at some point over the next few years, gold and silver prices started to go on a dazzling bull run similar to the one in the crypto space last year. If this happens sentiment towards these precious metals will change with a lot of ordinary investors wanting in to avoid FOMO (fear of missing out) syndrome thus enabling the price to rise higher. The beauty of the insane crypto bull run last year was that very few people saw it coming. If you read most of the comments on YouTube videos dated before 2017 relating to Bitcoin, most are negative and completely write off Bitcoin. A lot of that sentiment has changed now.

Generally, I prefer gold and silver bullion to owning shares in gold and silver mining companies. Yet on the other hand, just a modest rise in the price of gold and silver can cause an even bigger rise in the share price of gold and silver mining companies. What’s more, some of these companies also pay a dividend. But then you are also exposed to things like political risk if the mines are located in politically unstable parts of the world. Or company mismanagement etc. Owning gold and silver bullion protects you from these risks.

One site I like as a UK resident is called Bullion Vault. It enables one to invest in gold and silver bullion with no minimum limit. You can invest in just £10 worth of gold (which at current prices means owning less than a gram). And you can also choose the location of your vault in cities like London, Zurich, New York, Singapore etc. There are storage costs yet the storage costs are greater for silver than for gold. You do not own your metal physically in your hands (although there are bars you can purchase), but rest assured that the metal you purchase is yours safely in a vault and you would still own it even in the unlikely event that Bullion Vault itself went bust.

You can of course purchase gold and silver bars and coins, yet its your responsibility where you decide to store them. The Birmingham based BullionByPost is the largest online bullion dealer and a good contact to have.

 

Nicholas Peart

(c)All Rights Reserved

 

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in the article are mine and shouldn’t be taken as gospel. It is always important to do your own research before making investment decisions. 

 

Image: mining.com

 

 

Accepting Your Contradictions

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When I was younger, I tried very hard not to appear a hypocrite. I would look down upon those whom I perceived as blatantly hypocritical and unaware of their own contradictions. Yet no matter how much of a purist I tried to be, holes would always appear in some shape or form. The more I tried not to be a hypocrite, the more I began to feel the weight of life on my shoulders. In the process I felt my vitality and joie de vivre being sapped.

Some of the most inspirational icons in the world were full of contradictions. John Lennon is a great example. For much of his music career he promoted the ideas of peace, love and togetherness. He got his positive messages across to millions of people with great success, but his domestic life was at times anything but peaceful. It has been said that he could be volatile and even physically abusive. He spent very little time with his eldest son Julian (even though he wanted to mend his relationship with Julian before the time of his death). Yet does this diminish my opinion of John Lennon? Absolutely not. He was a hugely talented and authentic singer songwriter who openly acknowledged his flaws and contradictions, often in his songs such as Jealous Guy and Getting Better.

Accepting your contradictions is one of the most liberating and beautiful forms of surrender. The moment you do this, life becomes less heavy and sweeter.

 

By Nicholas Peart

(c)All Rights Reserved 

 

Image: susannp4

Talent Is Cheaper Than Table Salt

Table Salt

“Talent is cheaper than table salt. What separates the talented individual from the successful one is a lot of hard work.”

These are the words of the writer Stephen King. When I first read this quote several years ago, a part of me was outraged. My thoughts at the time were something along the lines of, ‘Talent is cheaper than table salt!?! Who does this man think he is!?! Talent is an asset goddammit!

After cooling down I re-read that quote in its entirety, beyond the first sentence…. ‘What separates the talented individual from the successful one is a lot of hard work.’ After pondering over the last sentence of King’s quote I slowly developed one hell of a reality check. The quote demythologises the notion of how talent by itself is enough to succeed. For many years I thought talent was all that one needed. All my heroes were outrageously talented and unique human beings. Besides I couldn’t care less for lesser mediocre beings regardless of how hard they worked. I despised mediocrity.

Some complain that we live in a society where mediocrity is rewarded. And maybe they are right to complain? After all some of the biggest names in the world today are quite ordinary people and one could even come to the conclusion that they have very limited talents with nothing enlightening to say. That may be. But they are successful, because they work incredibly hard and know what makes the average individual on the street tick. They work tirelessly whilst also mirroring Joe and Joanna Blogs, giving them what they want.

 

By Nicholas Peart 

(c)All Rights Reserved 

Forget Bitcoin, Is This A Stock Market Bubble I See Before Me?

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Bitcoin has had a stellar year rising from a low of under $1000 a coin at the start of the year to an unprecedented high of almost $20,000 just last week. The general consensus is that Bitcoin is in a dangerous bubble that will pop very soon akin to the Dutch Tulip and South Sea bubbles of many moons ago. Yet the price keeps on rising. Analysts have been pronouncing the death of Bitcoin ever since the price was just a mere $0.23 a coin back in 2010. You can visit the website 99 Bitcoins to view the countless botched BTC obituaries. No matter whether you believe Bitcoin will continue on its dizzy heights or crash and burn, there’s no denying that the underlying blockchain technology will play a paramount role in the transition towards a cashless society.

 

A look at UK Fund manager Neil Woodford

With every person and their Jack Russell engulfed in the current crypto-mania epidemic, it is easy to overlook other potential red alerts on the financial landscape. Earlier this month, top fund manager Neil Woodford went on record stating that financial markets are entering a bubble phase yet elaborated on this by saying that while many stocks are overvalued there are also many companies, which are undervalued. Woodford has come under a lot of heat these last few months after a number of stocks in his CF Woodford Equity Income Fund portfolio have fallen substantially in value. Yet the stock selection of his portfolio is interesting. While the portfolios of other fund managers are weighted more towards large multinational and defensive companies such as consumer brands company Unilever or alcohol goliath Diageo, and are minimising exposure to the UK in the wake of all the uncertainty created by the 2016 Referendum result (as well as the possibility of an anti-business Jeremy Corbyn led Labour government abruptly coming to power), Woodford’s portfolio is heavily exposed to the UK. Woodford thinks that there is too much negative sentiment towards the U.K. economy and as a result many domestic U.K. companies are very attractively priced (due to panicky investors reducing their exposure to UK stocks) with potentially minimal downside and plenty of upside should sentiment towards the U.K. economy improve.

 

Warren Buffett, NASDEQ all time highs, and the 2000 dot-com crash

Any good student of the world’s most famous living value investor Warren Buffett would spot these opportunities and at the same time be very cautious of stocks with high valuations trading at close to all time highs. In the USA, the FANG (Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google) stocks fit the bill as well as several other stocks trading on the NASDEQ index which has been on an off the charts bull run. The incredibly high valuation of the NASDEQ Index combined with the mesmerising new highs breached by Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies like Ethereum and Litecoin create the perfect storm for a repeat of the spectacular Dot.com crash of the early 2000s. At the height of the dot.com bubble, the NASDEQ composite shot up to a high of 5000 points around the turn of the new millennium before crashing to almost a 1000 points in 2002. Since the beginning of 2009, after the 2008 Financial Crash, the NASDEQ has been on an incredible run motoring from 1200-300 points to almost 7000 points reaching an all time high of 6,914 points this year. It is today trading very close to that high in the range of 6,840-80 points. Whether history has a habit of repeating itself or not it sure has a habit of rhyming, to quote Mark Twain.

 

Market sentiment and looking beyond it

One of Buffett’s most famous and often quoted mantras is; ‘be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful’. Yet the Buffett pearl of wisdom I’ve always taken to my bosom is; ‘the market can remain irrational longer than you can stay solvent’. One would like to think that stocks are priced according to their fundamentals but it is always sentiment that is the winner. The current Bitcoin craze is the perfect example. Sentiment is incredibly positive and gung-ho towards this creation that is seen as revolutionary and a disruptive game changer in the world of money, and consequently many want in whatever the price. The FOMO (fear of missing out) bug is very strong. But sentiment can always change at the flick of a switch and when that happens it will be the fickle inexperienced investors with weak hands who bail out the first even if that means incurring staggering losses.

Neil Woodford is the quintessential student of Warren Buffett who is periodically on the look out for undervalued and unloved stocks whilst steering clear of expensive and hot overvalued stocks. If positive sentiment towards the U.K. economy returns at some point in the future and Sterling makes further gains against other major currencies, Woodford’s fund will end up not only beating the FTSE index but substantially outperforming the funds of other star fund managers. Brave investors with strong hands prepared to dip their toes into his fund at this stage could end up handsomely rewarded.

 

Why has the FTSE been reaching all time high levels?

The root of the FTSE trading at a very high level is because of the high valuations of big multi national companies such as Unilever, Diageo and British American Tobacco trading at (or at least close to) all time high levels and their current combined market caps representing a humongous slice of the total FTSE 100 pie. At around the beginning of 2000, shares in Diageo were trading below £5 a share. They recently reached a high of almost £27 with a total market cap in excess of £65 billion. Shares in British American Tobacco were also trading at below £5 a share around that same time period and over the years have performed very well reaching an all time high of £56.43 earlier this year with a market cap in excess of a whopping £120 billion. Unilever shares less than ten years ago in 2009 after the 2008 Financial Crisis could be snapped up for under £15. Earlier this year they reached a record high of £45.57 a share with a market cap almost nudging £60 billion.

One of the principle reasons why many FTSE companies have been reaching all time high levels in the last 12 months is because, since they are global companies, their earnings are received in many different currencies. When the Referendum result was announced in the U.K. last year Sterling dropped to a 30 year low of 1.34 against the dollar. Since this time, the value of Sterling continued to decline bottoming around the 1.20 mark against the dollar before returning to that initial 1.34 level against the dollar that it was just after the Referendum result. During the last 18 months, these multi national companies have benefited enormously from a weak Sterling valuation and yet in spite of this some are still trading on PE (A company’s share price against it’s earnings per share) ratios of 20 or more. Now what would happen if sentiment towards the U.K. economy were to improve and consequently Sterling were to climb to pre Referendum valuations of 1.40 to the dollar or higher? This would affect the foreign earnings of these multi national companies when converted back into stronger Sterling. And by extension lower their earnings per share. Their share prices would likely cool down quite significantly

 

Out of the Sinking: Recent performance of recovering blue chip miners

The Holy Trinity of Unilever, Diageo and BAT are all solid bullet proof defence companies but cheap they are not. At the height of the commodities slump less than two years ago around the start of 2016 all of the blue chip mining companies were trading at unimaginably low levels. Today with sentiment towards these mining companies vastly improved, they are trading at much higher levels and, consequently, are not the bargains they once were not so long ago. During that time one could have hovered up shares in Australian mining titans BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto at just over £5 and £19 a share respectively. Earlier this year BHP shares were trading at over £15 each (with an LSE market cap on the LSE in excess of £30bn) whilst Rio shares went over £38 (with an LSE market cap at one point breaching £50bn). Even more impressive is Anglo-Swiss multinational commodity trading and mining juggernaut Glencore. Today the shares are trading at over £3.50 (LSE market cap over £50bn). At the height of the slump Glencore shares could have been snapped up at less than 70p. Many junior mining companies with higher production costs didn’t survive the slump in iron ore prices but the blue chip mining companies with lower production costs got through this difficult period. Sentiment towards all miners at the time was very bearish and that was reflected in the share prices. But those investors brave enough to take the plunge are now, providing they are still holding their shares, sitting on enormous paper profits.

 

Hunting for bargains

Although some companies are trading at, or close to, historic highs and thus pushing the FTSE index close to record high levels and fuelling fears of a stock market bubble, a large number of companies are trading at heavy discounts. Interestingly the vast majority of these companies are UK domestic companies where sentiment towards the U.K. economy is poor. For example, many of the UK house-building companies, while not trading at the very low levels they once were after the Referendum result was announced, are trading on low PE ratios in the region of 10-11, which is less than the accepted fair value PE of 15. These include FTSE 100 companies Barratt Developments and Taylor Wimpey (both firmly in Neil Woodford’s fund) trading today at £6.28 and £2.03 respectively and both with similar market caps around the £6.5bn mark. If there is any future further weakness in the share prices that would obviously make them even more attractive as investment opportunities.

Two other UK companies in Neil Woodford’s portfolio which are currently very depressed are the FTSE 100 company Capita and the FTSE 250 company Provident Financial. The share price of the latter company collapsed spectacularly back in August this year from a high of close to £35 a share to at one very brief interval sinking to below a fiver. Since then they have currently been trading in the £7-£9 range and can currently be bought for around £8. The crash was rooted in the problems encountered in the business’s Home Credit division. It is a risky share and more downside cannot be ruled out but the potential upside if the business were to recover is huge. Woodford has taken a lot of criticism for the performance of this share yet he remains unfazed and in fact has been accumulating more shares at these new depressed levels. The business support services company Capita has also experienced a huge share price decline tanking from a high two years ago of over £12 a share to its current price of £4.74 a share. The decline in the share prices of both companies means that they now pay very generous dividends. Whether they will be maintained is anyone’s guess but in the case of Provident the current yield is too good to be true at over 15% and for Capita it’s just under 7%.

Two enormous British multi billion pound companies trading at depressed levels are BT Group and energy giant Centrica. BT shares have almost halved in value from a high of around £5 back in 2015 to a low of £2.42. The shares are currently trading at £2.70 with a current market cap of close to £27bn (with nearly that same amount wiped off its from its all time high – quite a dent to the overall FTSE index) and paying a generous dividend yield of over 5%. Centrica has been experiencing an even rougher ride falling from a high of over £4 in 2013 to a low of just £1.33 this year. The last time the share price was below £1.50 was over ten years ago in 2003. Currently the shares are trading at £1.45 and at this level paying a dividend of more than 8%. And at this price the market cap of the company is over £8bn (with around £14bn wiped off the company’s value from its high in 2013). The root of BT’s fall from grace is an accounting scandal at the Italian division of the company. Centrica is struggling with the prospect of political intervention via price caps for its customers and increasing competition. Both companies display certain levels of risk and sentiment is poor for those reasons. One could also come to the conclusion that much of these risks are priced in to the depressed share prices. There is also the risk that those companies now experiencing huge dividend yields because of their low share prices risk having their dividends cut. That cannot be ruled out.

Not all big multinational companies are trading at close to all time highs. The pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline has a huge global presence and is currently trading at above £13.14 after having fell to £12.70 from a high of over £17 all within the space of this year. At its current level it still has a collosel market cap at around £64.5bn and is now paying a dividend yield in excess of 6%. The company does come with quite a lot of risk despite its size. It has very high levels of debts and the pharmaceutical industry is very competitive. In spite of this GSK is a diversified pharmaceutical business and a huge money spinner. However I think it can still fall further especially if the dividend is cut (which may be a sensible idea to reduce the company’s debt pile) which I see as very likely. This would probably create further weakness in the share price and would be an absolute steal if £10 or less were breached (being a huge company further deterioration in the share price would dent the FTSE 100 composite substantially – every time the share price loses a pound in value, GSK – and by extension the FTSE 100 – becomes £4.9bn poorer).

One more solid British company, which I like that is trading at a low valuation is the defence and engineering service company Babcock. In 2008 after the Financial Crash, the shares were trading under £4 before going on an upward trend reaching an all time high above £14 in 2014. Since that high was reached the shares have been on a downward trend and are now priced at £6.76. This is a substantial discount to it’s all time high. As well as the attractive price its trading on a forward PE of less than 10 and currently offers a not to be sniffed at 3.89% yield. Babcock is also featured in Neil Woodford’s portfolio. What’s more, I see plenty of potential upside to the current price and even the possibility of the dividend being increased.

 

Disclaimer: For the record I am not a qualified financial adviser. I am not Nostradamus. I have no crystal ball. As always it is very important that you do your own research before making any investments. Never ever make investment decisions based solely on what someone says.

 

By Nicholas Peart

Written: 11th – 12th December 2017

©All Rights Reserved

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