More Golden Nuggets From Outer Space

Late last month I wrote a post reviewing the seminal Nuggets compilation album of forgotten 1960s American psychedelic garage rock singles. These are timeless and magical songs and I feel that there are many more ace singles from around that time that also deserve investigation. So in this post I am featuring more of these gems, which hope you will all enjoy as much as I have…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nuggets: A Sample Of Songs From The First Psychedelic Era (1965-68)

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Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era is a seminal album of American psychedelic/garage rock singles released in the second half of the sixties. It was compiled by the founder of Elektra records, Jac Holzman and Lenny Kaye, who later became the lead guitarist in Patti Smith’s band. This album was originally released in 1972 and was an enormous influence on the punk movement towards the latter part of the 1970s.

I remember when I first purchased this album one summer’s day ten years ago in 2006, I was simply blown away by the music. Of course I’d already heard many ace songs from that time but discovering this album was like finding a buried treasure chest containing many brilliant but forgotten songs of that era. Sometimes I get upset for having been born too late and what I’d give to be transported back to that time; watching one of those bands in some dive bar somewhere in San Francisco. When I listened more to the album it almost became like a vicarious journey back to those fertile and exciting days. This also coincided with my early travelling days. On long bus and train journeys I’d get lost in these amazing songs; like noise from other galaxies enfolding me.

Below I am featuring a taster of this wonderful album with some of my favourite tracks. I hope you enjoy them and get inspired by these gems…

 

The Remains – Don’t Look Back

 

 

The Castaways – Liar, Liar

 

 

The Amboy Dukes – Baby Please Don’t Go

 

 

Sagittarius – My World Fell Down

 

 

The Third Rail – Run Run Run

 

 

Text by Nicholas Peart

25th August 2016

All rights reserved

South African Hip Hop

Last weekend when I arrived at my hostel in the Maboneng district of Johannesberg, I dumped my stuff in my dormetory room and headed for the bar. There I met a couple of friendly Joberg students. I was not planning on having a big night but in the end I ended up partying like it was 1999. We concluded the evening at Stones nightclub in Melville which is a lively and energetic hotbox den of all the latest SA hip hop sounds. I am no connoisseur and, albeit a strange obsession with DMX, know very little of the genre. Anyway, here are some videos motherf***er…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Death Of David Bowie, The Future and 3D Printing

This is a piece I wrote on January 12th 2016, a couple of days after David Bowie died

I’ve been thinking about nothing but David Bowie these last couple of days. So many of his songs are playing in my head; Sound and Vision and Heroes being the most popular. Heroes always makes me pause and be deeply pensive. There’s something majestic and timeless about that song. Like millions of others around the world I am saddened and shocked by his early death. I had no idea he was so unwell even though I was a little suspicious that something was not right regarding his sporadic movements over the last decade. Another clue that perhaps all was not well was from watching the video to the 2013 song Where Are We Now? from his penultimate album The Next Day. It’s a beautiful, haunting and deeply reflective song. More importantly, it seems to me like he’s seriously questioning his own mortality. When I initially saw the video to that song I could see real pain in his face and I began to feel very sad for him.

In my selfish state of mind I was hoping that he would tour again but I can now kiss that option goodbye. I remember one day back in 2003 pondering on whether to see him live at Wembley Arena. The Dandy Warhols were confirmed as his support band. That day I was at the Stargreen ticket office on Argyll Street in Oxford Circus and the lady at the desk told me they still had tickets left for the show but I foolishly declined on the grounds that I thought the £65 ticket price was too high. As the years went by and I got more deeply into Bowie’s music the desire to see him live increased exponentially but that was never to be as, after a heart attack in 2004, he retreated into splendid isolation with his beautiful wife Iman and the rest of his family. I have seen his compadre Iggy Pop live many times (and I even saw his other soul brother Lou Reed live once but he was dreadful and in a foul mood that day, which was a huge disappointment for me) and as special as Iggy will always be to me, I still regret not taking that unique opportunity to see David live. But life goes on man.

Taking a slight tangent, I often wonder what kind of people the people born today and in the last few years will grow up to be? I don’t know what the world is going to be like in 2020 let alone in 2030 or 2050. I humbly predict that by 2100 there will be no purely organic/biological human life still standing. I think by then all humans will be at least trans-human (half human/half machine). If the inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil’s 2045 prediction for ‘The Singularity’ comes true then by 2050 artificial intelligence will be on par if not far more advanced than human intelligence. The question now is will this advanced level of AI further benefit our lives? Perhaps we can augment our bodies with AI technology in order to be compatible with AI itself as far as logical/mechanical intelligence is concerned? Or will it have dystopian consequences and wipe us all out? Some prominent figures such as the scientist Stephan Hawking and Tesla founder Elon Musk have already publicly expressed much concern that a situation like the latter may very well happen and Musk has even gone as far as to spend a large chunk of his vast fortune on AI research.

By the beginning of the 2020s I predict that 3D printing will slowly start to become mainstream. Currently 3D printing machines are the preserve of scientists and a smattering of ‘geeks’, innovators and early adapters. It is also still rather expensive to acquire a 3D printer but with time costs will decrease and the technology will only get more advanced. I think 3D printing will be the biggest thing to shape our lives since the Internet. 3D printing now is what the Internet was back in 1994/5. Give it time.

Now back to the subject of David Bowie, there is an interview he did with Jeremy Paxman in 2000. At one point in the interview they were talking about the Internet and what it meant back then. Paxman seemed to have little belief in the power of the Internet and stated that he thought it was just a ‘tool’ whereas David disagreed and saw it as potentially a much bigger and larger force (both good and bad) to what it currently was. In fact, Bowie was one of the first major artists to utilise the Internet as a platform for his music when it had just become mainstream back in 1997. Now let’s fast forward to 2016. The Internet plays an enormous role in our lives. It has also disrupted many industries in the process. The one that really springs to mind is the music industry. Many will remember the Napster saga involving members of Metallica back in 1999 but how many back then could have foreseen the colossal impact that illegal downloading would have on an entire industry worth billions of dollars? For many creative people; especially writers, musicians and digital photographers, this is now the age of Free Content. Yet what the Internet has enabled is an instant connectivity and strong social networking facility with an enormous and growing number of people around the globe, which was not possible before.

 

David Bowie talks about the Internet with Jeremy Paxman (2000)

 

Back to 3D printing. The main casualty of this emerging technology is going to be the mass manufacturing industry. “Made In China” will become a thing of the past as every household becomes a factory. Big mass manufacturing businesses like IKEA will either have to adapt in the face of this growing technology or potentially face serious challenges to their current business modal. I believe that the next 5-15 years are going to be very interesting.

For more information on this I highly recommend that you purchase a copy of The Curve by Nicholas Lovell. It is a riveting and incredibly insightful and enlightening book which is very ahead of its time. Furthermore, it is an indispensable book to have with many helpful and practical solutions if you are a creative person struggling to make a living in a world of free content.

 

by Nicholas Peart

12th January 2016
London

 

(All rights reserved)